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Boston and Beyond

June 1, 2014

Governor Patrick wants to lift liquor license cap

BOSTON (AP) — Gov. Deval Patrick is pushing legislation to give cities and towns more control over the number of liquor licenses in their communities.

Lawmakers passed a bill last fall allowing the town of Norfolk to grant a liquor license to a local food mart. The measure was one of at least 18 bills the Legislature approved last year allowing communities from Fairhaven to Fitchburg to grant an additional liquor license to a specific business.

Patrick and others say that while doling out individual liquor licenses has become commonplace on Beacon Hill, it’s also cumbersome for local cities and towns trying to build their economies.

“What we are saying is you ought not to have to come — if you’re Lowell or any other city or town — to the Statehouse and get legislation passed to get one more liquor license,” Patrick said recently on his monthly radio show on WGBH-FM. “That decision ought to be made locally.”

Under state law, the cap on the number of licenses allowed in a city or town is set by a formula based partly on a community’s population numbers. To go above the cap requires the Legislature to pass a separate piece of legislation for each additional license.

Patrick’s bill would remove the cap, eliminating the Legislature from stepping in.

Testifying at a Statehouse hearing Thursday, Secretary of Administration and Finance Glen Shor argued that the change also would be a boon to the state economy by streamlining the licensing process and giving local communities more control.

“We have heard from developers who cannot start construction because lenders are refusing to finance projects until they know the project will have an adequate number of liquor licenses in place,” Shor said.

House Speaker Robert DeLeo and Senate President Therese Murray haven’t yet said whether they support the legislation. Although requests for additional licenses are vetted by legislative committees, typically little or no debate takes place before they are approved by the full House and Senate.

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