EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

Business

April 21, 2013

To save endangered languages, tribes turn to tech

LAS VEGAS (AP) — In a windowless conference room in a Las Vegas casino, about three dozen people are swishing their fingers across iPads, trying out test versions of new apps and screening for glitches.

But these are no Silicon Valley techies in town for one of the city’s massive electronics shows. Many are from far-flung American Indian reservations, and their high-tech devices are serving a decidedly old-school purpose: trying to save their languages from the brink of extinction.

Experts say a growing number of tribes are trying to revitalize their languages, which in some cases are spoken by only a small handful of people. And increasingly, they’re enlisting technology in the effort.

“We’re in a race against time,” said Lewis “Bleu” St. Cyr, 26, who attended the February workshop to scope out the possibility of developing a language learning app for the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska. “The goal is for younger kids to get interested.”

Linguists estimate about 200 Native American languages are spoken in the U.S. and Canada, with another 100 already extinct. In the early 1990s, experts estimated only 11 percent of tribal languages were still being passed traditionally from parents to children. The bulk of the surviving languages were spoken only by tribal members who were middle-aged or older.

Today, most tribes across the country are making some type of effort toward a language comeback, according to Leanne Hinton, a Berkeley linguistics professor and board member of the Advocates for Indigenous California Language Survival.

Those efforts include everything from apprenticeship programs that pair a fluent elder with a student, to immersion school programs. Many also incorporate technology such as YouTube videos of native speakers or Google Hangout video chats for live, long-distance conversations.

St. Cyr, who serves as media specialist for the Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska’s Ho-Chunk Renaissance Program, says he’s always on the lookout for creative ways to bring the Ho-Chunk language back to life. So far, he’s worked up a language quiz game based on the show “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?” and has been using Facebook and YouTube videos to get young people engaged.

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