EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

Columns

August 19, 2012

Column: Why isn't anyone talking about foreign policy?

National security and foreign policy have received short shrift in the 2012 presidential election campaign. Mitt Romney made a quick swing through Britain, Israel and Poland to suggest he would repair strained relations with America’s closest allies. President Barack Obama has repeatedly reminded voters that he gave the order to kill Osama bin Laden. That’s about it.

For the most part, each campaign has sung a single note: Romney has tried to convince voters he can fix the broken economy. Obama has tried to convince voters that Romney is a heartless, plutocratic tax cheat and, possibly, a murderer to boot.

Consequential international issues should be part of the debate. Among them: In Seoul on March 26 Obama was caught on tape assuring then-Russian president Dmitry Medvedev, Russian strongman Vladimir Putin’s factotum, that he would have “more flexibility” after the U.S. presidential election. He stressed that this would be “my last election” — implying that once that chore was out of the way he would no longer need worry about voters and what they think.

What was Obama promising to be more flexible about? The microphone picked up the phrase: “these issues — but particularly missile defense.” Putin, of course, has long been adamant that the U.S. leave itself permanently vulnerable to a Russian missile attack, that the U.S. not use its cutting-edge technology to protect people and property from offensive missiles that might by fired by Russians.

Even good reporters persistently get this wrong. They talk about Putin’s “fears” that American missile defenses would be “aimed” at Russia. But American missile defenses can be aimed at only one thing: missiles targeting America or Americ

a’s allies. You aim a spear; you don’t aim a shield.

There are Americans who agree with Putin, arguing that the Cold War doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction (MAD) worked well and should be maintained. On the other side are those who contend that we now have the know-how to prevent offensive missiles fired by any nation from reaching their intended victims, and that we should put this knowledge to use — for both strategic and moral reasons.

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