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November 10, 2013

Relatives want say at Boston gangster's sentencing

BOSTON — For the families of 11 murder victims, the conviction of gangster James “Whitey” Bulger brought some sense of justice after decades of frustration. But for others, the jury’s decision was yet another denial of the peace they have long sought.

Even though Bulger was not convicted in the deaths of their loved ones, eight families are hoping for one last chance at closure by testifying this week at the notorious Boston gangster’s sentencing.

But Bulger’s lawyers — and two jurors who sat on the case — say those families should not be allowed to make victim impact statements because the jury acquitted Bulger in those killings.

“My feelings are that 18 American citizens were put through a 10-week trial ... and now the verdict we deliberated on so dutifully is being mocked,” said Janet Uhlar, one of the jurors who sent a letter to Judge Denise Casper asking her to deny the request from prosecutors.

Uhlar told The Associated Press she feels sympathy for the families, but she believes they will never get the kind of closure they are looking for and blames federal prosecutors for “opening the wound of these family members” by asking that they be allowed to make impact statements.

After spending nearly 17 years on the run, the South Boston gangster was convicted in August in a sweeping racketeering indictment that included 19 killings, money-laundering, extortion and weapons charges. A two-day sentencing hearing is scheduled to begin Wednesday in U.S. District Court.

Prosecutors are seeking two consecutive life sentences plus 5 years for the 84-year-old Bulger. Whether the eight families get to speak or not, he is bound to die in prison.

Bulger’s lawyers say that allowing impact statements from relatives of people he was acquitted of killing “trivializes the jury’s function.”

“The court should only entertain impact statements and other evidence relating to crimes of which he has been convicted,” they argued in a legal brief.

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