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Lifestyle

March 12, 2014

Ancient masks go on display in Jerusalem

JERUSALEM (AP) — The oldest known masks in the world went on display in Jerusalem on Tuesday in the largest-ever exhibit of the ghoulish faces, believed to have been created in the Holy Land thousands of years before the time of the Bible.

The 11 stone masks, said to have been discovered in the Judean desert and hills near Jerusalem, date back 9,000 years and offer a rare glimpse at some of civilization’s first communal rituals.

“It’s quite exciting,” said James Snyder, director of the Israel Museum, which is hosting the seven-month exhibit. “When you go back to objects that are this old, that are so much before the theology that becomes Judaism, Christianity and then Islam, to feel that there is a kind of a connection, that this is all part of a continuous story, is something that is pretty thrilling.”

The masks are thought to have been fashioned to look like skulls, and each one has its own personality. Some have round cartoonlike holes for eyes, others flash a grin of tiny teeth. One elongated mask bears a resemblance to that of Hollywood villain Hannibal Lecter of “Silence of the Lambs.”

The masks have long been an enigma. Most of the artifacts had made their way into the hands of private collectors over the past several decades, so it took 10 years of carbon-14 testing and comparison to similar masks discovered in documented Israeli excavations for experts to determine their authenticity and origin.

Iain Morley, a professor of paleoanthropology at Oxford University, said the items are believed to be the oldest of their kind. “I don’t think there’s anything that early from other parts of the world that you can say is a mask,” said Morley, who isn’t involved in the exhibit.

In the past few weeks, researchers say they have resolved one of the masks’ mysteries. Computer simulation tests conducted at Hebrew University in Jerusalem have led experts to conclude that many of the masks may have been worn on people’s faces, not tied to structures at ritual sites as was previously thought.

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