EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

Lifestyle

June 1, 2014

Gear up! With modern resources and equipment, there's more time than ever to sing around the camp fire

For those of us who are nostalgic about childhood camping trips, or who want to try tent camping for the first time, the logistical challenges can seem daunting. Never mind figuring out where to go and what to bring; how about the anxiety surrounding a headlong dive into the unfamiliar wilderness?

Fear not. A wealth of online resources, a new generation of camping equipment and a national network of user-friendly campsites make reserving a place to pitch a tent no tougher than hailing a cab.

“The main misconception about camping is that it’s hard,” said Chuck Stark, a senior camping instructor at the REI Outdoor School in Chicago. “When you start planning, it’s actually really straightforward. The key is to keep it simple.”

The first step, he said, is to do a little homework and figure out where you’d like to go. “The Best in Tent Camping” book series (Menasha Ridge Press) reviews campsites in 30 states and is loaded with detailed ratings that can help you avoid blaring stereos, convoys of RVs, poor maintenance and concrete slab platforms. Many other local guides, both online and in print, are also available.

Next, identify what’s essential to your comfort. Maybe it’s back support (bring a cot). Or having separate tents for kids and parents. Or bringing s’mores. Or earplugs: The wilderness can be surprisingly noisy at night.

Before setting out, reserve a place to pitch your tent — ideally as early as nine months before. Luckily, the reservations process is now similar to that at a hotel — without the hefty price tag.

Perhaps the single most important resource for campers in the United States is the online reservation service ReserveAmerica.com, which includes campgrounds in state and national parks, as well as many run by regional agencies and some private companies.

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