EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

Lifestyle

December 1, 2012

How do hipsters celebrate Hanukkah?

IrOnically

(Continued)

Sage Saturn, 22, puts the “ish” in Jewish. He’s fresh out of college, not a Jew but hangs out with many and works as a graphic designer for Moderntribe.com, a site loaded with ways to dive into hipster Hanukkah.

“I think more people like me are into exploring what they don’t know,” said Saturn, who dumped his hard-to-spell real names for two way-cool made-up ones.

Among his favorite Hanukkah things: A menorah made of recycled bicycle chain.

Saturn’s boss, Moderntribe co-founder Jennie Rivlin Roberts, sees a whole lot of hipster in what she sells. There’s an insulated wine bottle holder made to look like a paper bag and a two-for-one deal on those boxes of word fridge magnets — one with Yiddish poetry and the other for bike lovers (hipsters love their fixies).

At 55, Shel Horowitz is more hippie than hipster. The expert on green and ethical marketing hipped up his Hanukkah more than a decade ago, when he moved with his wife and two small kids into a 1743 farmhouse in the western Massachusetts town of Hadley.

“We have beautiful starry skies,” he said. “We light four menorahs, put them in different windows and walk around the outside of the house to look at them while singing ‘Oh Chanukah.’ It’s just a special thing we do as a family.”

His kids, now 19 and 24, still make their way home for the annual walk around the house. For Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, you can find the Horowitzes up a mountain and in a stream near their solarized colonial.

Rafi Samuels-Schwartz, managing editor of the ‘zine Heeb, “the new Jew review,” has a few thoughts on hipster Hanukkah:

— “Jewish hipsters make their latkes out of organic, locally sourced potatoes from their CSA of choice,” he wryly observed. “They can go with standard recipes, or think globally with Mexican, Indian or Korean versions.”

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