EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

Merrimack Valley

March 14, 2014

Plumbers flush with pride

World Plumbing Day puts spotlight on trade's importance to public health

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“The safety and abundance of drinking water is, of course, a concern for most people all over the world, but what is not often emphasized is the work the plumbing industry contributes every day to alleviate these concerns. We would like your help in bringing a better understanding of the largely misunderstood role plumbers play in keeping folks safe and healthy each and every day.”

Fandel said that water conservation is becoming a much more conscious part of planning and construction, “We’re seeing water reuse systems, especially in large water users, public buildings. In our training, journeyman training, we teach a whole curriculum on water reuse and thermal, solar, pretty advanced water systems that you’re seeing now, that use a tremendously reduced amount of water, just for those purposes. Conservation is playing a key role even in areas where they have pretty good systems.”

“I’d say most people, I think they realize how important plumbing is,” said Nick Wormald, a plumber from Haverhill. “That’s why they call somebody, rather than trying to do it themselves. We’re dealing with dirty pipes, you know? And live water, which can cause a huge amount of damage, so if something’s not done right, if something bursts or something is leaking all the time -- it’s going make a lot of damage throughout your home.”

“The really significant thing,” said Hugh Kelleher, the executive director at the Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association of Greater Boston, “is that the advances in plumbing correlate very directly to advances in public health.

“When you look around the world, what you see is that those areas that do not have good potable water systems, and good sanitation systems, those are the ones that have by far the highest disease and mortality rates,’’ Kelleher said.

The Plumbing Museum was first opened in 1979 in Worcester, but moved to 80 Rosedale Road, Watertown in 2008.

It is free to the public by appointment. For more information go to www.theplumbingmuseum.org.

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