EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

New Hampshire

October 24, 2013

Officials issue contact lens warning

WASHINGTON — With Halloween rapidly approaching, federal officials are warning the public about the dangers associated with counterfeit decorative contact lenses.

Currently, the Food and Drug Administration’s Office of Criminal Investigations, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations, and U.S. Customs and Border Protection are working to seize counterfeit contact lenses, illegally imported decorative lenses, and lenses unapproved by the FDA.

Officials are warning consumers not to buy contact lenses from such places as Halloween or novelty shops, salons, beauty supply stores, or online if the site doesn’t require a prescription.

Although many places illegally sell decorative contact lenses to consumers without valid prescriptions for as little as $20, these vendors are not authorized distributors of contact lenses, which by law require a prescription.

Because of the inherent medical risks, it is illegal to purchase or sell contact lenses of any kind without a prescription from an ophthalmologist, optometrist or a specially licensed optician under the supervision of an eye doctor. Decorative contact lenses can typically be ordered from the office that conducts the eye exam and contact lens fitting.

The Fairness to Contact Lens Consumers Act gives the consumers the right to obtain a copy of their contact lens prescription, allowing them to fill that prescription at the business of their choice, including online discount sites.

Various legitimate stores and websites sell decorative lenses but consumers should avoid buying these lenses from anywhere that does not require a valid prescription.

Medical experts advise consumers interested in buying decorative lenses to get an eye exam from a licensed eye doctor, even if you think your vision is perfect; to get a valid prescription that includes the brand name, lens measurements and an expiration date; to buy the lenses from a seller that requires you to provide a prescription, regardless of whether you shop online or in person; and to follow directions for cleaning, disinfecting, and wearing the lenses.

Also, consumers should not expect their eye doctor to prescribe anime, or circle lenses, which give the wearer a wide-eyed, doll-like look, as these have not been approved by the FDA. Finally, an eye doctor should be seen right away if there are signs of eye infection, including redness, lasting eye pain or decrease in vision.

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