EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

June 15, 2014

U.S. Open leader has comfortable lead


The Eagle-Tribune

---- — PINEHURST, N.C. (AP) — A tough Pinehurst No. 2 tried to make a game out of this U.S. Open. Martin Kaymer always had an answer.

Already with one bogey on his card, Kaymer’s tee shot on No. 4 was so deep into the trees that his golf ball settled in sandy patch that had been washed out by rain, stacked up against 6 inches of pine straw. With nowhere to go and no relief available, he turned to USGA President Tom O’Toole and said, “If you have a way to play it, I’ll follow you.”

Kaymer navigated his way out of trouble just fine.

He escaped with a bogey by getting up-and-down from 165 yards. He followed with an eagle with a 7-iron from 202 yards out of more sand and weeds. And a birdie on the final hole gave him a 2-over 72 and a five-shot lead in a U.S. Open that finally lived up to its reputation Saturday.

“I kept it very well together,” said Kaymer, who was at 8-under 202.

Now he has to do it one more time, with a different cast of challengers behind him.

Rickie Fowler, with teen idol status in American golf, birdied the par-3 17th hole and shot 67 to get into the final group of a major for the first time.

Even more unlikely was the other player at 3-under 207 — Erik Compton, the two-time heart transplant recipient who considers it a victory just to be playing golf. Compton ran off five birdies and an eagle for a 67

“If I were to win the tournament, it would be obviously something that would be extremely special, not only for me, but for my family and for those who have been around me, and I think also for the community and those who have been through some tough times,” Compton said. “I might just sail off and never play golf again.”

Even so, this tournament is in the hands of a 29-year-old German who kept his cool on a broiling day of some wicked pin positions.

Only one player in U.S. Open history has lost a five-shot lead in the final round, and that Mike Brady in 1919.

“It would be nice if they make it difficult again,” Kaymer said of the pins, several of which were on the edges of the Donald Ross turtleback greens.

Only six players remained under par, and considering no one has come from more than seven shots behind in the final round to win a U.S. Open, they might be the only ones left with a realistic chance to catch Kaymer.

Dustin Johnson and Henrik Stenson each shot 70 and were at 2-under 208. Brandt Snedeker had a 72 and was another shot behind.

Kaymer had his way with a softer, gentler Pinehurst No. 2 by becoming the first player to open with 65s to set the 36-hole record at 10-under 130. Some players wondered what tournament he was playing.

There was no doubt what it was on Saturday.

Phil Mickelson had a 73 and was 13 shots out of the lead. He’ll have to wait until next year to pursue the only major keeping him from the career Grand Slam.