EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

World/National News

February 14, 2014

Hey Romeo, thank these guys for bringing the roses

MIAMI (AP) — If Cupid were to have a home, it would be Miami International Airport.

Before millions of Americans can present their loved ones with a bouquet of Valentine’s Day roses, most of the flowers are flown from Colombia and Ecuador to Miami, many in the bellies of passenger planes. There, cargo handlers and customs agents — call them Cupid’s helpers — ensure that the deep red petals stay perfect until they reach their final destination.

In the weeks leading up to Valentine’s Day, about 738 million flowers — 85 percent of imported flowers — come through the Florida airport. Los Angeles is a distant second, with 44 million. The roses, carnations, hydrangeas, sunflowers and other varieties are rushed by forklift from planes to chilled warehouses and then onto refrigerated trucks or other planes and eventually delivered to florists, gas stations and grocery stores across the country.

“We always joke that a passenger gets themselves to the next flight while a bit of cargo does not,” says Jim Butler, president of cargo operations at American Airlines.

The biggest problem this Valentine’s Day might be the final few miles of the journey. A massive snowstorm that blanketed the east coast has made some suburban roads difficult for local delivery drivers.

For U.S. passenger airlines such as American, cargo is a small, but increasingly important part of their business. New jets are built with more freight space and the airlines are adding new non-stop international routes popular with shippers.

Most airline passengers focus on what’s visible to them, like the amount of legroom and the space in the overhead bins. Few think about what’s beneath the cabin floor.

There’s fresh Alaskan salmon, this season’s latest luxury clothing from Milan and plenty of Peruvian asparagus heading to London. Then there are the more unusual items like human corneas, the occasional live cheetah or lion and large shipments of gold and diamonds.

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