EagleTribune.com, North Andover, MA

World/National News

December 8, 2013

Gene therapy scores big wins against blood cancers

In one of the biggest advances against leukemia and other blood cancers in many years, doctors are reporting unprecedented success by using gene therapy to transform patients’ blood cells into soldiers that seek and destroy cancer.

A few patients with one type of leukemia were given this one-time, experimental therapy several years ago and some remain cancer-free today. Now, at least six research groups have treated more than 120 patients with many types of blood and bone marrow cancers, with stunning results.

“It’s really exciting,” said Dr. Janis Abkowitz, blood diseases chief at the University of Washington in Seattle and president of the American Society of Hematology. “You can take a cell that belongs to a patient and engineer it to be an attack cell.”

In one study, all five adults and 19 of 22 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia, or ALL, had a complete remission, meaning no cancer could be found after treatment, although a few have relapsed since then.

These were gravely ill patients out of options. Some had tried multiple bone marrow transplants and up to 10 types of chemotherapy or other treatments.

Cancer was so advanced in 8-year-old Emily Whitehead of Philipsburg, Pa., that doctors said her major organs would fail within days. She was the first child given the gene therapy and shows no sign of cancer today, nearly two years later.

Results on other patients with myeloma, lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or CLL, will be reported at the hematology group’s conference that starts Saturday in New Orleans.

Doctors say this has the potential to become the first gene therapy approved in the United States and the first for cancer worldwide. Only one gene therapy is approved in Europe, for a rare metabolic disease.

The treatment involves filtering patients’ blood to remove millions of white blood cells called T-cells, altering them in the lab to contain a gene that targets cancer, and returning them to the patient in infusions over three days.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Latest News
World/National News

Latest U.S. News
Motels Near Disney Fighting Homeless Problem Michigan Man Sees Thanks to 'bionic Eye' Obama to Oso: We'll Be Here As Long As It Takes Bon Jovi Helps Open Low-income Housing in Philly Pipeline Opponents Protest on National Mall Hagel Gets Preview of New High-tech Projects S.C. Man Apologizes for Naked Walk in Wal-Mart New Yorkers Celebrate Cherry Blossom Blooms SCOTUS Hears Tv-over-Internet Case Justice Dept. Broadening Criteria for Clemency Raw: MN Lakes Still Frozen Before Fishing Opener Iowa College Finds Beauty in Bulldogs High Court to Hear Dispute of TV Over Internet Raw: Man Fatally Shot During Police Standoff Stowaway Teen Forces Review of Airport Security Thousands Cross Boston Marathon Finish Line Defendant Killed by Police in Courthouse Attack Raw: Woman Accused in Babies' Deaths in Court Raw: Sinkhole Swallows Part of Fla. Yard Stowaway Stirs Concern About Airport Security
Latest World News
Raw: Anti-Obama Activists Fight Manila Police Today in History for April 23rd 'Piles' of Bodies in South Sudan Slaughter Hong Kong Residents Help Create Green Roofs Raw: World Cup Trophy Begins Tour in Brazil Raw: Royal Couple Tours Uluru in Australia Chief Mate: Crew Told to Escape After Passengers Biden: Russia Must Stop Talking, Start Acting David Moyes Out As Manchester United Manager Raw: Leopard Bites Man in India Raw: Tesla Delivers First China Cars Biden Brings Message of Unity to Ukraine Today in History for April 22nd Raw: British Queen's Birthday Celebration Raw: Massive Fire at UK Industrial Site Raw: Mourners Gather for Peaches Geldof Funeral Raw: Biden Lands in Kiev for High-profile Visit SKorea President: Ferry Crew Actions 'Murderous' Raw: Fire Engulfs Tower Block in China Raw: Ferry Captain Received Medical Treatment
Photos of the Week