SPORTS PLAYED:

Varsity soccer, varsity indoor and outdoor track

BEST ACCOMPLISHMENT AS STUDENT:

Remaining in the Top 10 of the Class of 2021 throughout my four years. Though character, scholarship, and leadership are immeasurable in the perspective of class rank, I still found it as a goal to work toward as I strived for excellence in my classes. Based on the sheer size of Pinkerton and the weight of college leveled AP and Honors classes, this seemed like a daunting task. With hard work and determination and of course the support of several outstanding teachers at Pinkerton, I was successful. Freshman year I finished 4th out of 898 students, sophomore year I was ranked 6th out of 833 students, 5th out of 782 students as a junior and 7th this year..

FAVORITE SUBJECT:

I do not have a favorite subject, but that is okay. I tend to like math-based subjects better, but still I find that I am having fun as long as I am learning something new or applying it.

FAVORITE MOMENT AS ATHLETE:

I have fond memories from each sport I participated in, and I think I can narrow it down to three key moments. Soccer was the first sport I participated in during high school. I can still vividly remember the bubbling thrill and immense intensity of each Mack Plaque match. I can hear the Astros’ crowd cheering as the PA girls varsity soccer team sealed two underdog victories in OT during my freshman and sophomore years. It was an honor to represent my school in the most competitive athletic event of the year, something I will miss greatly.

BEST ADVICE FROM A COACH:

As a freshman who had only been a soccer athlete, I found myself extremely nervous to compete in track events, something I had never faced before. Luckily, my bright-spirited track coach, Michael Karthas was there with techniques to relax my mind. I went from nervously holding my breath to excitedly dancing before each race. Karthas taught me to embrace nervousness by counteracting it into excitement. His techniques, especially the dancing, allowed me to diminish worrying thoughts with unwavering confidence. I still use these tactics today to remind myself that success starts with mindset.

ON BALANCING STUDENT AND ATHLETE:

All student athletes out there can agree that this is far from an easy task. It requires commitment, dedication, and resilience in the face of adversity. My first tactic was establishing priorities on the basis of time management. From a young age, my parents taught me that school should come first and sports should come second. I strived to divide my time equally to both.

ADVICE FOR INCOMING FRESHMEN:

Have an unwavering optimism for the impossible. As a student-athlete, tasks can build upon the other calling for constant hard work. My dad taught me this important lesson of optimism through his reflection of his own use of it at work. Though tasks may seem difficult and time consuming, there should never be an instance where it is impossible. Instead, it is important to take seemingly impossible tasks as a challenge. and opportunity to succeed where no one else will. Everything can be solved with

COLLEGE PLANS:

I will be attending UMass Amherst to continue my academic and soccer careers. I chose UMass because it is a large, expansive university with endless opportunities for everyone who attends. I enjoyed the size of Pinkerton, and am curious to venture the vastness of a new campus. UMass is big enough to explore, feeding my desire for adventure. Though I am not sure exactly what I would like to study, UMass has a range of top tier schools and majors that allow for me to explore my interests. I am grateful to be able to continue my athletic journey along with my academic journey. Becoming a Division 1 collegiate athlete is a dream come true for me.

BEST LESSON LEARNED THROUGH COMMUNITY SERVICE:

Jeni Plender joined my soccer team six years ago, fitting well into the group. A wide smile spread across her face when she greeted me at practice. After seeing her three times each week, we naturally became good teammates and even better friends. Jeni and I, as captains, led our team to win our first NH State Cup, allowing us to go to Colorado for Nationals, one of the greatest accomplishments of our young soccer careers, yet the excitement instantly diminished when Jeni was diagnosed with lung cancer. She passed away four months later, fighting every minute still with a smile on her face. Though devastation crowded my young mind due to the loss of my good friend, I had to be strong for my team as a captain. I realized that holding up second place at the NPL National Cup, surrounded by teammates that persevered for the love of Jeni and their passion for the game, symbolized the importance of positivity and purpose to future goals.

BEING A LEADER MEANS ...

I have experience with being a leader by being the captain on my sports teams. In sports, many say that the captain should be the best player. This is far from the case, and Pinkerton’s varsity soccer coach, Danielle Rappa, helped me discover this. In my final two years of Pinkerton soccer, I was honored to become a two-year captain. During my senior year, I had a great conversation with Coach Rappa about what it means to be a leader. I discovered that although leaders may be looked up to for guidance, they are equal to everyone on the team. It is their job to connect and motivate their teammates as a friend, not an overarching force.

IN 10 YEARS I HOPE TO …

have graduated college, upholding the same standards that I have in high school. I hope to have created lasting relationships that have supported me in my pursuit to become the best version of myself, and I hope to have impacted others along the way.

REFERENCE:

When Macy asked me to write her an academic recommendation, I was surprised. Macy is doing well in my class (91.0), an excellent grade for a college prep physics class. I was surprised she asked me for a recommendation because I know she was doing even better in other classes, ranking 5th out of 900 in her class. So I asked her why she wanted me to write her a recommendation, she stated that she liked the class and thought that she was challenged. What struck me was the fact she was willing to challenge herself in a very difficult course. That is an excellent statement about her. She’s a great talent as an athlete, but she is even a bigger talent as a person.” — Stephen Gundrum, Pinkerton Academy physics teacher

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